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Thursday, September 6, 2018

How to Crochet a Hotpad - Super easy version!

When I first got married, my grandma made me several hotpads. That was one of the things she would make all the grandkids. It seems that she was always working on some when we went to visit. Over the years, mine have been used and used and used. They finally have worn too thin and I've given them to the kids to use with their toy kitchen.

So I decided to make myself some new ones. The last time I attempted this as a teenager, my hotpads were not square. I must have missed a bunch of stitches or something. I think I have gotten a little better at crocheting over the years, because this time they turned out fairly well.




These would be the perfect project for the beginning crocheter. The only stitches are chain and single crochet. I like them, because you don't have to count {except the chain}. It's perfect for when I'm waiting for my kids at their various activities, or while watching tv.

Because of the way that they work up, they are sometimes called a "magic" hotpad. You begin with a chain and single crochet and you continue around and around. Somehow it magically turns into a double layer square potholder.

Note: I've now added a fabric hotpad tutorial to the blog. It's super easy too, although it looks pretty fancy for only sewing 4 straight seams! This is a great project for beginners - it was my daughter's first sewing project at 4H.   I've also recently added a roundup of a dozen super EASY crochet projects, when you're done making this hotpad head over to find your next easy project.


How to Crochet a Hotpad - Super Easy Version!

I had to call my mom to remember how to do this. And after I tell you how, you might laugh that I couldn't remember. It's so easy!!

Note 9-6-18: I originally published this post in April of 2013. To date, it is one of my most popular posts, so I decided to create a video tutorial to walk you through making the hotpad. Please scroll down to the bottom of the page to view. If you are visiting from Pinterest: Welcome! I'm glad you're here!



Supplies Needed to Crochet a "Magic" Hotpad:


G or H crochet hook
Yarn
Scissors
Needle

The following crochet items are affiliate links. That means if you decide to purchase something, I will receive a small percentage at no extra charge to you.



{Printable Pattern}

Crocheted Hot Pad Pattern

1 - Chain 42

2 - Single crochet in each chain stitch

3 - When you get to the end, continue around and single crochet in each stitch of the unused side of the chain

4 - Continue as if you are crocheting in the round, with a single crochet in each single crochet.

5 - Your hotpad will first look like a strip, then it will slowly turn into a boat shape, then "pockets" will begin to form. Once the two sides of the potholder are touching, it's time to finish it off.

6 - Cut off the yarn leaving a 12-15 inch tail. Fasten off the end of your last crochet stitch with a small knot.

7 - With a large eye needle, sew the two flaps together.

8 - Weave the yarn through a few additional stitches to prevent unraveling and clip off excess.


Crocheted Potholder Visual Tutorial

For those of us who need a visual, keep reading, I'll walk you through each step. Or skip ahead to the video at the end of the post.

To begin, chain 42. This is going to end up being the diagonal of the hotpad.  For this first one I made, I only did 32 and it's too small. It's usable, but I like the bigger one I made better. I should have just believed my mom when she told me how many to chain.


Then you will single crochet in each chain until you get to the end.



When you get to the end you will not turn back like you normally do when crocheting something. Instead you will continue around and single crochet in each stitch of the unused side of the chain.


You will continue around and around, as if you were crocheting in the round.

Note of clarification from one of my readers: Do NOT chain one at the beginning of each round as you normally would, just continue one single crochet in each stitch.

 Next, I'll show you a few pictures of how it looked along the way.



 When you get to the point where your two sides are touching, it's time to finish it off.


Measure your yarn so that it is long enough to go from one corner of the hotpad to the other and add several inches. Cut.

Take a needle and sew the hotpad together. I sewed in each stitch. When you get to the end, weave in the yarn through a few stitches. Cut off yarn.


And there you have it! A brand new hotpad.


Watch the video tutorial!!
How to Crochet a Hotpad Video Tutorial








New to Crochet? 

Check out my latest post full of EASY crochet projects for beginners!

Yarn Embellished Pumpkins











45 comments :

  1. I always wondered how those were made! Thanks so much for sharing this pattern, I will make a few for myself :)

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    1. I did also wonder how they were done. These will be great holiday gifts and for my self

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  2. I also wondered how they were made. I am so going to do this and teach my daughter how to do it too. She is 9 and loves to do the chain stitch. She has even managed to make some things with a couple of rows. This would be a great project for her. I'm pinning! Have a great weekend!
    Blessings,
    Nici

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  3. Hi Rachel, thanks for sharing how to make crocheted hot pads. I will try and make one for the future. I am new to your blog and love it. I have a blog too if you would like to pop over and take a look at julieslifestyle.blogspot.com Take care and have a good weekend. Julie

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  4. What size crochet hook do you use? People in nursing homes that still crochet would love to make these.

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  5. I have these Pot Holders (with loops to hang)& I've used them as Hot Pads. I have wanted to make some but hadn't come across any pattern even close to being similar. I believe mine are crocheted in a non-cotton yarn (I'll change that) and will have to play with Hook sizes since the size you used wasn't mentioned. The center, diagonal seam was stitched up just a bit farther inward but no matter; can't tell you how excited I am, after searching for so long, to be able to make these myself. I love the colorway you used too. Thank you so much for sharing this pattern.

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    1. I think I used an H hook, but G or I would work well too.

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  6. I am moving out in October (first time living on my own) and don't have any pot holders and have been looking for patterns (I'm also trying to use what I have and not spend unnecessary money!), this one is fabulous! From one of the photos it looks like you are using yarn that I have extra spools of. Mine is acrylic, is that what you used? If not, would they work as well or should I bite the bullet and purchase cotton yarn for it?

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    1. ONIY USE cotton, lily SUGAR & CREAM, OR lion BRAND peaches & cream , arcylic yarn melts or flattens with hot pans

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  7. These are the best hot pads in the world. Very forgiving in hook size and yarn type. Make them larger for placing on a table or smaller for holding the pot handle. I love mine and they are no brainers to make. :)

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  8. Thank You I had seen my grandma doing these but didn't understand her instructions as to how she was doing them. Thank You for sharing this pattern. Margaret

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  9. My Grandma showed me how to do this 40+ years ago. Over the years I've made a gazillion of these for myself, family and friends. I use 38 chains. Good way to used the leftover yarn from other projects. I take the number of ch sts I use for the foundation ch, divide that number by 2 and that's how many rounds/rows I have to make plus 1/2 a row to the corner, then I stitch it together. I've made anything from coasters to hotpads to larger ones for hot skillets. I even made a chair pad once. Just measure from corner to corner how big you want your project to be, then crochet that many chains for your measurement. I use an F or G hook.

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  10. do you use cotton yarn for these, or regular worsted weight yarn?

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    Replies
    1. I usually use regular worsted weight yarn, but cotton should work too.

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  11. Nice photo tutorial. Only thing I would change would be to slip stitch crochet the edges together. Much easier.

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  12. Rachel, Absolutely what I was looking for. I am going a bit bigger for a hot pad which I will give to my camping buddies. Hot pans and pots coming out of the RV will now have a pretty and durable pad to prevent melting the plastic table cloth. I was looking for a thick pad that was easy. Your directions and pictures where so helpful. I love the yarn and color you chose for the tutorial. Would you mind sharing the yarn choice? I am multiple pads. One with Lily Sugar n Cream cotton yarn Sonoma print and then Earth Ombre. Thanks you so much. I am excited to give these away as gifts.

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    1. I'm so glad you find the tutorial helpful. I'm sorry that I don't recall the yarn I used - I made that set almost 3 years ago. It was Red Heart brand, but I don't know the name of it. Good luck with your gifts.

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  13. I have made dozens of these since I learned how to do them from another poll worker during the election Reagan won. I personally prefer an H or I hook and ALWAYS use cotton yarn because acrylic will melt if it touches a burner or flame by accident. Cotton stays thicker and doesn't flatten the way acrylic would. Cotton does fade faster (don't bleach it) but....it's better than having all your work ruined or getting a burn because the acrylic wasn't enough insulation to protect you. I use them for pot holders and hot pads. They are fast and easy! The lady who taught me the pattern taught me to put three sc in each of the 2 end chain stitches. I am going to try one without the extra two sc and I have a hunch your way will be a more perfect square. Great share... Thank you!

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  14. Most of the yarn companies have a worsted size pure cotton yarn. I personally prefer "Sugar and Cream" or the equivalent by Lion Brand. "Peaches and Cream" is a little cheaper and is the easiest to find but it has a stiffer feel to it and it's rough on your hands while crocheting. I don't think it will last as long either. Anyway, do try to use cotton for the best result. You can also make them a little smaller and use them for coasters.

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  15. Thank you for giving us this pattern. I've always wanted to try it but it look too complicated so I never would try it. I made one and plan on making many many more.

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  16. how much yarn does it take ...do you need more than one ball of sugar and cream yarn to make this size? Thanks

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    1. I have not used sugar and cream yarn to make one of these before. However my guess is that one ball would be enough to make one. I can get two out of a skein of red hart yarn. I'd love for you to reply back to this comment if you decide to go for it and let us know for sure. Happy Crocheting!

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  17. Thank you for posting this pattern. I have some that my grandfather made.I love them. Now I can add to my collection.

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  18. ive been making these for over 60 yrs, i use Lily cotton yarn sugar & cream or another brand called peaches & cream, use a hook size G or H so its tight . they are awesome, when my son had a liver transplant 13 yrs ago i had found the yarn on sale at Micheals for a dollar a ball i can get 4 out of three balls & every nurse on his ward had a set, & their friends from other floors was asking to buy some, the crocheting kept me from going crazy all the many months of being in& out of the hospital before getting the transplant, by the grace of God & crocheting i servived, & MY SON IS FINE.

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    1. I'm so glad your son is well. I'm glad that you had your crocheting to help you during that hard time.

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  19. Beginner crochet'er here....why are mine never square? They are always a rectangle. LOL

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    1. My first hotpad turned out more of a trapezoid than a square - so you're not alone:) It's hard to say without being able to watch you crochet, but my thought is that maybe your stitches aren't all the same size. This is a common issue with beginners because it's hard to keep the tension of the yarn the same. You might start out with loose stitches and as you get into the flow of crocheting, your stitches may become tighter {or vice versa}. I would just keep working on it - it eventually becomes second nature and is much easier to keep the tension the same throughout your projects.

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    2. When mine have been rectangular it was because I thought the edges had met but I really needed another row or two. Doing too many rows will cause the same thing. Fortunately being a little off doesn’t matter, they still work great.

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  20. Rachel....may I suggest you add to your instructions that you do not chain 1 before going around each time? Some might be confused and do that. I'd also like to share with you that I've been doing this pattern for years, and if you chain 21 or 25, you can make a nice size coaster. We call them mug rugs :) I also use an H hook, but a G does work. It was really kind of you to share this!

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    1. Yes, I'll add that clarification. Mug rugs sound fun - I'll have to give them a try

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  21. How can you turn this pattern into a lap blanket? I love the pattern and have attempted blankets but would just increasing in the corners keep it in a square? I do not have the expertise to figure that out.

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    1. I have not tried a lap blanket with this pattern. I would suggest that you figure out how long you want the blanket to be from corner to corner diagonally, then chain that long. Then continue with the single crochets around and around as in the hotpad pattern. Please leave any feedback about how you end up doing it and what works or doesn't. Good luck with your project!

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  22. L-O-V-E!!! Christmas is coming. Thank you, Rachel!!!

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  23. L-O-V-E!!! Christmas is coming! Thank you, Rachel!

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  24. Wool is even better than cotton. It withstands very high temperatures and is flame resistant. It won't melt like acrylic and is less likely to catch fire than cotton. The wool shrinks and "felts" when washed/dried, making it even more heat resistant.

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  25. I especially like the colors in this yarn...can you please tell me what color/name brand you used? I love this pattern and will be making several!!

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    1. I don't recall the color, but it was red heart yarn. Good luck!

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  26. Great pattern I've made bunches of these. But do not use acrylic yarn for a hot pad! A hot pan or dish can melt it. 100% cotton isn't as soft, but it works well and it's much safer.

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  27. I am most interested in using this pattern for rectangular hot pads. Please help me on this as I am in need of hot pads...

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    1. The nature of this pattern creates a square hot pad. If you would like a rectangle hotpad, may I suggest this tutorial: https://www.adventuresofadiymom.com/2013/04/crocheted-scalloped-edged-hot-pad.html

      Or you can search "crochet scalloped edged hotpad" in the search bar above my picture.

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  28. I have made these for years...I Love them :-) Love your aqua one..

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    1. Thank you! They're kinda fun to make, aren't they?

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